24.10.2010: David Suzuki speaking in the Sydney Opera House

Greatly admired around the world as an environmentalist, author and broadcaster, David Suzuki is embarking on his last tour of Australia to davidsuzukidiscuss his life’s work and latest book The Legacy.
If you had one last lecture to give, what would you say? The Legacy is David Suzuki's response to this question and the culmination of his life’s work.
David Suzuki is a leading environmentalist, author and broadcaster who is greatly admired for his work in popularising science, and environmental advocacy. He is recognised as one of the world’s leading authorities on climate change, sustainability, and clean energy, and in 1990 he cofounded the David Suzuki Foundation. Its stated aim is to “conserve our environment by providing science-based education, advocacy and policy work, and acting as a catalyst for the social change that today's situation demands.”
For his last Sydney appearance Dr. Suzuki will present a critical and candid exploration of a period of human history which includes his own life's journey — an era which has overlapped and converged with many of the most important social, scientific, cultural and political developments of the past seventy years. His focus also acknowledges the wisdom of his grandparents and moves forward through to the promise held in the birth of his new grandson.
Born in 1936 in Vancouver, Suzuki, a third generation Japanese-Canadian, was interned during the war in British Columbia. He credits his father with cultivating his interest in nature which was solidified by a Ph.D in zoology at the University of Chicago.
Suzuki began his television career in 1970 with the kids show Suzuki on Science. Since then he has hosted Science Magazine (CBC), The Secret of Life (PBS), A Planet for the Taking (CBC), and Yellowstones to Yukon: The Wildlands Project (Discovery). The Nature of Things (CBC) has been broadcast in nearly 50 countries worldwide.
He has written 43 books (including 15 for kids), been awarded 22 honorary degrees and received UNESCO’s Kalinga Prize for science. In 2004 he came 5th in a poll run by CBC for the greatest ever Canadians.

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